Orlando Police Respond to Fatal House Fire

According to the US Fire Administration (a branch of FEMA), in 2017 the United States played involuntary host to more than one million fires, resulting in a loss of more than 3,400 lives, injuring more than 14,000 others, and causing more than $23 billion in damage. As much as those figures are an improvement on historical numbers, they are still large enough as to make the data impersonal.

On the flipside, most every accidental loss of life due to fire hits hard to a hyperlocal group of friends and family who are immediately impacted… and with that uplifting remark we reach this video.

There is a law enforcement presence at the scene of nearly every fire in the United States. Now, it is by no means obvious that the 5-0 are needed at a fire. After all, that’s hose monkey work. Cops… make light-hearted fun of them.

What is the role of a police officer at a fire? The answer will vary somewhat depending on the specifics of the incident, but I did want to provide at least one concrete answer to that question, and this video is it. There may be more; we’ll see.

Here we go.

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IN OTHER NEWS (UPDATE TO HARLEY PURSUIT VIDEO)

For the past week+ I have been working to uncover more (read: any) information about the Ohio State Highway Patrol’s pursuit of a Harley offroad and into the woods.

My work finally paid off:

The pursuit took place on July 4, 2018 and the rider of the motorcycle was Robin Buckels, male, age 46, from Painesville, Ohio.

(Fun fact about Robin: On 6/2/16 he won $10,070 on a Keno scratch off.)

Buckels was charged with failure to comply, ‘permitted operation without a license’, operating a motorcycle without a helmet, and unsafe operation. All except for failure to comply were dismissed. Same sentence as I had previously reported, plus $592 in fines and a temporary license suspension. I have updated the description of the pursuit video to reflect the above, and that video can be found at http://tiny.cc/bikepursuit.

** (Disclaimer: This video content is intended for educational and informational purposes only) **

Author: rafael.nieves

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37 thoughts on “Orlando Police Respond to Fatal House Fire

  1. Over my professional career as a firefighter (retired captain), I had my share of fire fatalities. It never got easy having to search for those who perished in the fire. Having to deal with packaging and removing their remains was always very taxing on the firefighters. Many times you couldn't even tell that the person was an actual human being.

  2. What a great Public Servant the Lead Officer is! He has a way of responding to the needs of the families! God Bless him for telling the family he didn't want them seeing their loved one like that. He didn't want them to have that last memory.

  3. Firefighters are some AMAZING people! We sure are blessed to have so many brave men and women stepping up to handle these extreme emergencies for us (I bet their families are some awesome people, too!). I hope things turned out ok for everyone who survived.

  4. Losing a beloved family member to a fire is the most excruciating experience one can ever have. I lost someone who was so close and they would not let me see her at the hospital. Same thing they said here, you don't want to remember her that way. I always felt like I should have said goodbye, but my brother kept me from doing that. Don't know which is worse to be truthful. To have seen it or what my imagination conjures up. But it has been many years now (1985) and I will never forget the feeling of emptiness and loss. It is so hard not to be able to see that person one more time.

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