Cop Pulls Over The Wrong Lamborghini Owner | The Other Side

Investigating this story revealed the existence of another, much more significant story, in Oregon. It’s the story of how a legislative accident made dash camera footage secret.

Most Oregon State Police (OSP) patrol vehicles are equipped with dash cameras. Paired with wireless microphones, dash cameras create a contemporaneous objective recording of law enforcement encounters, providing footage that supports investigations, prosecutions, training, and accountability while encouraging lawful and respectful interactions between the public and the police. Dash camera recordings are public records in Oregon and they are not exempt from disclosure.

An otherwise-mundane change in OSP’s recording technology has turned that transparency on its head.

In 2015, the Oregon legislature voted to create a conditional public records exemption for police body-worn camera footage. The change came about through HB 2571 (2015), thanks to which ORS 192.345(40) conditionally exempts:

“Audio or video recordings, whether digital or analog, resulting from a law enforcement officer’s operation of a video camera worn upon the officer’s person that records the officer’s interactions with members of the public while the officer is on duty.”

The exemption’s language is convoluted, but its target is clear: police body-worn camera recordings. No one was trying to restrict access to police dash camera videos.

Unfortunately, they did. Technology changes that were unanticipated in 2015 have put a lid on the meaningful disclosure of state police dash camera footage, and this is happening right now.

Oregon State Police recently finished rolling out body cameras to all of their troopers. Prior to the rollout, any given trooper’s dash camera audio came from a wireless microphone carried by the trooper. Now that troopers have body cameras with built-in microphones, the original wireless microphones are redundant. OSP’s new body cameras use the body camera audio feed for both the body camera video and the dash camera video.

Two separate video feeds. One body camera audio feed. See the problem?

Because the dash camera audio comes from the body camera microphone, the dash camera audio falls under the body camera audio exemption. It is an “audio… recording… resulting from a law enforcement officer’s operation of a video camera worn upon the officer’s person…” The consequence of that linguistic accident is a dramatic curtailment of public access to police dash camera recordings, which for any given trooper will only be released without sound—from the moment they start using their new body camera. This is not theoretical. OSP has already denied requests for dash camera videos with sound. Because the trooper has a body camera. Which is as absurd as it sounds.

The public today demands transparency in policing, and this unexpected restriction on access to public records has the potential to further erode the public’s trust. I have watched video (with audio…) of the public hearings and work sessions associated with HB 2571. No one saw this coming, and no one asked for it. This is the result of a mistake.

It needs to be fixed.

00:00 Intro and backstory
01:30 The traffic stop
02:48 “No plate”
06:28 Call from Patrick Fuller, request for reconsideration
11:57 Rummer was made a Verbal Judo instructor
14:25 The traffic stop continues
16:20 “I have another call”
18:22 The BLOGGER
25:35 “You’re speaking to a BLOGGER”
27:08 “I know all the laws”
30:23 Where are your complaint forms?

Thanks to @Stig’s Persian Cousin, for being a champ.

~~~

/r/realworldpolice
@realworldpolice
@What You Haven’t Seen

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYZrhePIr9Q ** (Disclaimer: This video content is intended for educational and informational purposes only) **

Author: rafael.nieves

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43 thoughts on “Cop Pulls Over The Wrong Lamborghini Owner | The Other Side

  1. Senior Trooper Donald Rummer was sustained for violating Oregon State Police policies regarding "Inappropriate Conduct" for being "rude/unprofessional" during a traffic stop. The discipline imposed was a verbal reprimand.

    Investigating this story revealed the existence of another, much more significant story, in Oregon. It's the story of how a legislative accident made dash camera footage secret.

    Most Oregon State Police (OSP) patrol vehicles are equipped with dash cameras. Paired with wireless microphones, dash cameras create a contemporaneous objective recording of law enforcement encounters, providing footage that supports investigations, prosecutions, training, and accountability while encouraging lawful and respectful interactions between the public and the police. Dash camera recordings are public records in Oregon and they are not exempt from disclosure.

    An otherwise-mundane change in OSP’s recording technology has turned that transparency on its head.

    In 2015, the Oregon legislature voted to create a conditional public records exemption for police body-worn camera footage. The change came about through HB 2571 (2015), thanks to which ORS 192.345(40) conditionally exempts:

    "Audio or video recordings, whether digital or analog, resulting from a law enforcement officer’s operation of a video camera worn upon the officer’s person that records the officer’s interactions with members of the public while the officer is on duty."

    The exemption's language is convoluted, but its target is clear: police body-worn camera recordings. No one was trying to restrict access to police dash camera videos.

    Unfortunately, they did. Technology changes that were unanticipated in 2015 have put a lid on the meaningful disclosure of state police dash camera footage, and this is happening right now.

    Oregon State Police recently finished rolling out body cameras to all of their troopers. Prior to the rollout, any given trooper's dash camera audio came from a wireless microphone carried by the trooper. Now that troopers have body cameras with built-in microphones, the original wireless microphones are redundant. OSP's new body cameras use the body camera audio feed for both the body camera video and the dash camera video.

    Two separate video feeds. One body camera audio feed. See the problem?

    Because the dash camera audio comes from the body camera microphone, the dash camera audio falls under the body camera audio exemption. It is an “audio… recording… resulting from a law enforcement officer’s operation of a video camera worn upon the officer’s person…” The consequence of that linguistic accident is a dramatic curtailment of public access to police dash camera recordings, which for any given trooper will only be released without sound—from the moment they start using their new body camera. This is not theoretical. OSP has already denied requests for dash camera videos with sound. Because the trooper has a body camera. Which is as absurd as it sounds.

    The public today demands transparency in policing, and this unexpected restriction on access to public records has the potential to further erode the public’s trust. I have watched video (with audio…) of the public hearings and work sessions associated with HB 2571. No one saw this coming, and no one asked for it. This is the result of a mistake.

    It needs to be fixed.

  2. Check out how this so called peace keeper comes up to a car and the cop says that he is the man!! This cop is so hateful. I wish it was me!!! This cop is just so stupid!!!!! This cop is so wrong in so many ways!!!!!!!!! I pray this cop gets fired. This trooper is so gun wanting!!!!

  3. Police officer in the US is a lucrative job.

    In the US, the police are allowed to attack citizens and rob them of their money.

    It must be terrible living in a country where the police see the people as the enemy.

    It must be terrible to live in a country where the police, if we're lucky, are trained for a few weeks. But in this training, you will only learn how to assassinate citizens.

    It must be awful living in a country where children are shot in the back at long range.

    It must be terrible living in a country where the police are officially allowed to lie.

    It must be terrible living in a country where the police are allowed to attack innocent citizens and rob them.

    Something like this only happens in a third world country like the USA.

    American policing: the only job where the customers have to know all of the company policies, but the employees don't need to know any.

  4. Wow the one guy bitching an moaning non-stop, being condensending to whomever he speaks, proceeds to give a lecture about "Attitude"

    This was a hard video to listen to and it makes me feel sorry for dispatchers.

  5. The officer is a complete douche. Also the caller (Patrick fuller) was a complete entitled douche as well. You’re a third party and you’re going to take your third party anger out on some dispatch guy. Dispatch guy did a good job killing him with kindness, making him spin his wheels. Dude was all talk..

  6. I really don't see the big deal here because the officer pulled over a car with obvious plates from outside the U.S. I would think that was a reasonable response and to laugh and act like the idea that this sort of thing is an everyday normal situation is probably what made the officer irritated. I've been driving for over 30+ years and have never seen a plate from another continent on a car legally so for the trooper to question this shouldn't be unreasonable.

  7. The blogger at the end calling is such a loser. All I hear through it is your not giving me my way and I'm from entitled California and I'm the law not you. He's a complete loser.

  8. He had a plate, if he's blind or legally blind he shouldn't be operating a vehicle and yes Dubai residents often take their cars with them bc we ain't money huggers like non-Middle Easterners lmao

  9. The trooper might have been ignorant of the laws and should be better educated, of course. But these callers are sooo much more obnoxious and completely ridiculous. "35 million listeners", LMAO, sure thing, buddy… 🙄

  10. 'oh yeah they dont work on sundays only monday thru friday in the office. oh yeah big sarge is in a big meeting right now.' 'how many meetings you guys have on sunday?' beautiful lol

  11. Does anyone know who the 1st amendment auditor actually is? Would love to call him and have a discussion and give him a taste of his own medicine.

  12. This cop sucks. His Entitlement is showing. I hate to see how he treats other people of color. If he treats him like that. He needs to be fired.

  13. that trooper wasnt professional but this guy calling in didnt go about things correctly. he didnt help things at all. he needs to be calmer and less angry. he really didnt give this officer a chance to answer his questions.

  14. Just know….. what this is, is someone with a shit ton of money and will go after you for stupidity lol. All people need to realize we have dash cams and knowledge and this is just damn funny to watch. Patrick had me dead af ☠️☠️🔥🔥

  15. Yall are bootlicking the dispatcher like he didnt try to take the call instead of just transferring him. Cop was on a power trip then ran away, and u morons just made an edited 30 min video of the auditors? Rich

  16. I've drove this road so many stretch of times, I've probably blew by this exact cop too. Right south of Albany, OR!

  17. Jeremy Dewitte would have been in and out, with no confusion.. just straight business and FACTS.. while stating ALL relevant statutes😆😆 give or take…

  18. 'No you're not visiting as a tourist if you have your car with you.'

    Stupid pigs that don't even know the law, and act like they do when they're completely wrong. Lol. What a clown

  19. The caller wants to make a complaint about an issue that hasn't happened. Yeah, take him and his imaginary lawyer seriously.

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